Do You Want to Be a Hero? Live WELL

Heroes Live Well

Lea Dubedout photo  – Unsplash

When you live in the past you live badly.

Your past is like a condensed movie of your life that flashes by the side of the highway as you speed by; the years passing by faster than street lights.

In the re-run of your life, you are embarrassed by your mistakes, and want to edit those scenes out, but you are an evolving organism, and learning hard lessons made you stronger.

Your shame made you aware, and your awareness made you forgive yourself and move forward, then you forgive other evolving organisms for their mistakes.

Looking back shows how far you have traveled on your journey. You have been altered by your experiences have altered you in the eternal classroom of life.

In the space-time continuum, your pit stop on earth can be free from regrets if you decide to search for ways to live WELL.

You were put on earth to be a hero. To reach your true potential. To become someone you admire.

To work hard doing what you love, maintain your body, expand your mind, and nurture your soul with positive thoughts and gratitude.

Honoring yourself transforms you into a tiny hero.

When you express yourself you light a tiny candle and your light spreads.

It illuminates the path of your future.

Death inches closer each day, kindling your urgency to live well – to love lots, and to value your life.

You don’t fear death when you are fully immersed in life.

You raise your standards, and perform brave deeds and noble acts.

Your plot has new twists. You adopt a dog. He has hero worship in his eyes for you. You feel good.

You show compassion to a person who needs some. You feel good.

Your struggle with life is gone when you do what feels good, and connect to others.

You remove your 3-D glasses and see things as they are. The world is beautifully imperfect.

You understand that everything happens for a reason. Chance occurrences benefit you.

You wouldn’t change your journey because it brings you to the movie of your future.

When your journey has ends you are a full grown hero. Mission complete.

When you love and live well, you die happy!

The last scene of your life is not a flashback, but a foreshadowing of your next journey. Your perspective has changed. Your body will dissolve, but your spirit will remain.

You are drawn to the warmth and peace of the ambient light from the screen. Love is everywhere. The music fades to a humming chorus and transitions you to a new time zone.

The credits roll. It’s a happy ending. You look forward to the after party!

  • Go to the profile of AnnHoy

    AnnHoy

    Welcome! I write about expanding your life on my blog annhoy.com  — #loveyourself, #positivethinking, #optimizingyourself, and #wellbeing are recurring themes.

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    Cramming for My Last Performance Review…Ever

    final performance review

    Slogan in rainbow pens

     

    When I was eleven, I decorated the landscape with my slogan, BANKSY style.

    I wrote it on rocks, tattooed it on my hand, squeaky chalked it on a chalkboard, wrote it with my finger in the sand at the beach, and in the sky with a pretend pen.

    I entered teenagehood inked in a pastel rainbow of felt pens.

    My slogan?

    I WAS HERE

    Why a slogan?

    I was excited to go new places without my parents and make decisions on my own for the first time and leave evidence of the experiences everywhere I went.

    I was being me.

    Over the next thirty years, life seemed to happen to me, and I became too busy for slogans, while pursuing my goals of having it all and doing it all. It felt like I was twisting and turning at full speed through the pathways of a maze in a rat race pace.

    I felt disconnected as if I was more of a human doing than a human being.

    Five years ago, I stepped back and finally recognized how much time has passed. Both of my parents had passed away, and instead of longing for my independence, I longed to spend an hour with them.

    Taking a moment to ponder my life helped connect me to myself and to the spiritual world beyond.

    I was back to being me.

    I don’t believe death is it. After death, I think I proceed forward to the next stage in my spiritual life.

    But first I must pass a performance review.

    How do I prepare for this? I can’t change my past, but I can work on creating my future.

    But I have some serious cramming to do to develop my character and skills to become the best person I can be. If I don’t ace that performance review I fear being sent to some God-forsaken place, or face an indoctrinated Catholic’s worst nightmare — to suffer in purgatory with all the other sinners for eternity!

    By creating my own Hippocratic Oath, like the one doctors take, I outlined all the character traits and skills I need to work on to be my best.

    What is my new slogan?

    TREAT OTHERS HOW I WANT TO BE TREATED

    My oath is all about who I become as a person.

    It is about being kind, compassionate and forgiving.

    Tony Robbins says: “Who you become as a person is the ultimate reward. The goal is about what it makes of me as a human being while pursuing it.”

    I feel so relaxed knowing that I am not going to get anywhere in my life’s journey!

    The journey is about becoming, not arriving.

    It’s about this minute –

    Now!

    I don’t know when my performance review will be, so I am eternally grateful for my blessings today, and the opportunity to live my life to my potential.

    The reward is who I become, and I realize that my greatest gift is that:

    I AM HERE

    Originally published on Medium in The #ChooseYourself Writers Group:   https://medium.com/choose-yourself

    photo credit:  photopin.com/ creativecommons.orgPens in rainbow colors

    #gratitude #doing #being #performance #oath #becoming

  • Go to the profile of AnnHoy

    AnnHoy

    Welcome! I am Ann Hoy blogging about expanding your life — #loveyourself, #positivethinking, #optimizingyourself, and #wellbeing are recurring themes.

     

    Redefining Success – Still Making Mistakes – W. Brett Wilson Book Review By: Ann Hoy

    work/ life balance

    Finding The Way to Work/Life Balance

    As mentioned on my previous blog post, I won a contest to have lunch with W. Brett Wilson, this month.  I watched The Dragon’s Den tv show where Brett was a panelist many times, but since I will be meeting him, I read his book:  “Redefining Success, Still Making Mistakes” and wrote a review.

    I don’t go too deep into the subject of business on my blog, other than to promote wealth consciousness and the law of attraction.  But reading the book made me aware of the importance of ‘business consciousness’.

    The book contains a wealth of entrepreneurial information, but, on a deeper level, the book explores some of the same topics that my blog does:  personal growth and development, optimizing your time, loving yourself, recognizing your ego, positive energy, fulfillment, nurturing your mental, physical and emotional health, love of pets and family, and forgiving yourself and others.

    The book illustrates that we can be proud of our business achievements, while feeling pain in our personal lives, but if we are willing to change the things we can, we can harmonize our work and life, and achieve true success in both.

    Book Review of : “Redefining Success, Still Making Mistakes”  By: W. Brett Wilson

    Reviewed By:  Ann Hoy

    Penguin Books

    $20.16 Amazon.ca (hardcover) – Amazon review rating: 4 out of 5 stars

    $14.44 Chapter’s on sale (paperback)

    W Brett Wilson had an insatiable drive to succeed in business, and became one of the top entrepreneurs and philanthropists in Canada.  But his drive to achieve outward success, took a toll on him and others, and left him feeling “surprisingly hollow”.  The highs and lows on this investment bankers’ road to success, went up and down like the stock market, and taught him the importance of investing in his most precious assets – his health and relationships.  The main theme of this book is how he manages to balance his inner self with his outer self, to find the path to authentic success.

    This book can be found in the business section of the book store, and contains a lot of business advice, but it also contains a lot of life lessons. It appeals to entrepreneurs who are inspired by Brett’s journey to become one of the top investment bankers in Canada, and to fans of the CBC’s Dragon’s Den, where Brett was a panelist who made deals with the contestants. He devotes about fifty pages of the book to describe those deals.  It also appeals to philanthropists, interested in how Brett’s generosity combined with marketing mojo helped to raise tens of millions of dollars for charities “to make the world a better place”.  While readers may not be able to relate to making million dollar deals in the boardroom, they can relate to the feeling that their life/work priorities are misplaced and need to be re-aligned.

    Brett says that students should be taught how to make money in school, so when I finished reading the book, I gave it to my teenage son to read.  Being a man of action, and not only words, Brett opened The Wilson Centre for Entrepreneurial Excellence at his alma mater, The University of Saskatchewan, so students could meet with the business community to share ideas and network with researchers, mentors, and possible investors.

    Brett espouses the values of hard work, honesty and giving back to the community in the book, which were instilled in him during his upbringing in North Battleford, Saskatchewan, by his parents – a social worker mom and salesman father.  Brett lived those values, and carried them with him while initiating deals on a handshake, even as co-founder of FirstEnergy, the investment bank “with a conscience” in the lucrative oil and gas industry in Calgary, Alberta.

    Brett also describes his mistakes – his adrenaline powered, all out work obsession, led to wealth, awards, and celebrity, but he neglected his inner self, and years of not spending time with his wife and three growing children eventually destroyed his marriage, and left him depressed.  He sought treatment for being a workaholic, cut back on his work hours when he got joint custody of his children, and worked on recovering his relationship with them, only to get diagnosed with prostate cancer.

    This is the turning point in 2001, when the magnanimous spirit who had donated so much of his time and money to help others is battling cancer himself.  Instead of turning another’s  failing business around, he must now turn his own life around, to optimize his physical, emotional, and intellectual health. “Sometimes your greatest hardships lead to your greatest triumphs”, said Brett.

    The book ends when he finds his path to health and happiness, has a strong bond with his children, and realizes the truth of what Ralph Waldo Emerson said: It’s not what you have, it’s who you are” that counts.

    This thought-provoking book has inspired me to study more about entrepreneurship, marketing, philanthropy and work/life balance, in the coming months, and to incorporate these topics into my 52 weeks of optimizing yourself posts on my blog this year.

    Photo of cover: Ann Hoy

    It’s How You Do The Job, Not What Job You Do

     

    It's How You Do The Job
    Resumes Highlight Your Skills and Abilities

    Years ago, I ran a resume writing business, and many of my clients had lost their jobs.  The upshot of losing their employment was that many of them lost their self-confidence as well.

    They had identified themselves with their profession, and losing it made them feel dejected.  From my  client who had worked at Tim Horton’s, to my client who was the television announcer for Molson’s Hockey Night In Canada, (and was off during the strike), it wasn’t WHAT job they did, but HOW they did it, and how it made them FEEL, that was most important.

    As I compiled their skills and abilities on their resumes, and restored the client’s glass half full mentality, they grew more optimistic about selling themselves at job interviews to prospective employers.   It was easier to find a job with a positive emotional state.

    One of my clients had experience as a janitor, but his dream job was to be a karate instructor, and he had taken karate classes for ten years.  We designed his resume to showcase his work experience, but also his karate experience, so he could work as a janitor, and train to teach at a dojo also.  His attitude about his job search improved immediately, having taken a small step towards finding his dream job.

    It was the clients who envisioned their dream job, when applying for jobs, who felt motivated to excel at whatever job they got.

    Even the simplest job can be done with passion, quality workmanship and love, in the spirit of service to others.   The following story illustrates that HOW you do the job is more important than WHAT job you are doing.

    An old story tells of three stonecutters who were asked what they were doing. The first replied, ‘I am making a living.’ The second kept on hammering while he said, ‘I am doing the best job of stonecutting in the entire country.’ The third one looked up with a visionary gleam in his eyes and said, ‘I am building a cathedral.’

    The first stonecutter is working to earn his pay for his labour.  The second stonecutter continues to hammer while saying he is driven to be the best stonecutter in the country.  But cutting the stone is his ultimate goal, without regard for the reason he is cutting it.   The third has a vision – he recognizes the significance in the task of creating a cathedral.  He sees the big picture and how his contribution connects him to his community.  Enhancing the spiritual lives of the residents fulfills him, and the fruits of his labour of love extend beyond benefiting himself, to benefiting future generations, long after he is gone. He puts his heart into cutting the stones, with an understanding of WHY he is cutting them.

     

    photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/reid-bee/5424049276/”>jazzijava</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/”>cc</a>