About Ann Hoy

I am a freelance writer from Vancouver BC, writing about my family, positive thinking, humor, and bettering yourself

The Teething of Writers

Teething of Writers

Joanna Kosinska photo/ Unsplash

What would happen if we quit every time it was hard to learn a skill?

Like writing. When my writing is stuck, I feel frozen.

If at first I don’t write something good, I try,try, again, like a masochist who keeps going to the dentist for the pain.

I stress out that my writing won’t resonate with anyone, and throw crumpled papers on the floor.

My dentist’s receptionist says she enjoys reading my blog, so does the hygienist; I don’t want to clean other people’s teeth — but if they love to do it, that’s the coolest job in the world.

As babies we suffer through the agonizing process of teething, until swollen gums and screams are replaced by toothy smiles. As we grow, those teeth become loose, and make way for bigger, stronger ones. Similar to the process of becoming a writer.

You must endure the pain of doing bad writing in order to get better.

Start somewhere. Start anywhere. Start where you are, with what you have.

That’s how you learn what works and what doesn’t.

Don’t pass judgement.

Be fearless.

Miles Davis said:

“Do not fear mistakes, there are none.”

Keep writing even if nobody likes what you write. Even if YOU don’t like what you write. Don’t give up.

Don’t lie in bed worrying that your creativity is gone. That will leave holes in you like the ones left by your wisdom teeth.

Don’t wait for a muse to inspire you. The tooth fairy for adults is busy…simply start writing!

Writing isn’t supposed to be perfect, or forced.

If you try to force your writing, it will knock your teeth out.

“Great works are not performed by strength, but by perseverance.”

– Samuel Johnson

You can be boring, discouraged, and full of writer’s envy, but hold on to your vision to write anyways.

Your self-critic accuses you of having nothing interesting to write and asks: “Who do you think you are?”

You don’t have to be the greatest writer that ever lived to write something.

At the moment the writing struggle starts to wear you out, you develop a resiliency that renews you, and inspiration does the writing for you. Then you are fit for the next writing challenge.

Bad times fade. Take a snow day to read a book and get unstuck.

You gain momentum to get you back to stardust and wonder.

It’s like finally finding your pen in the snow. Bringing it inside warms the ink. You draw a scribble to test it, and the melted ink oozes freely.

A voice says: “change that, copy someone you admire, use your voice, even if it is immature, or rusty, or shy. Right now. Where you are.”

After all, Nobody else has ever written it quite like You, nor ever will.

Published on Medium.com

Thank You Anna Henricson!

Twitter @AnnHoyBlog

Careful! Your Resolutions May Straighten Out Your Priorities

2016 resolutions

photopin creative commons

Dear Friends:

You may find that being beautiful, abundant, loving, friendly, healthy, fit, secure, peaceful, smart, kind, sober, rich, spiritual, sociable, intelligent, motivated, rested, relaxed, creative, and successful is possible.

You may find someone who supports your positive changes.

You may find that healthy habits feel better than unhealthy ones.

You may find that habits like eating, smoking, drinking, and gambling to excess aren’t as fun as being in charge of your actions.

You may find that feeling good is the reward.

“The reward of a thing well done, is to have done it.” Seneca

So Do it now.

Today is all you have.

One step today, another one tomorrow, and another the next day, will elevate your self-respect and make you feel good.

You reward yourself.

Good luck!

Bye for now, I’m going to the gym with my workout buddy!

Leave a comment about what step you are taking now to make 2016 THE BEST.

Love Ann.

The Miracle of Reiki

Miracle of Reiki

Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh – Photopin

 

I have a low-grade pain on my side, that gnaws at me like the drops of water that eventually erode a mountain.

Most of us have pain, be it physical, mental, or both.

We can’t turn down the volume on pain, so we are of one of two camps:

  1. We never tell anyone about it.
  2. We give everyone we meet the full run down.

I handle the pain on my left side by sleeping on my right side.

It has never stopped me from doing anything, and I try to ignore it.

But during my first Reiki session, it would no longer be ignored.

A blonde woman named Sarah was sitting by the window in the room, her hair and fair complexion glowing in the soft winter sun that flooded in.

She asked me to lie on the table, and covered me with a plush fleece blanket.

In a soft voice, she asked if I had any pain. I pointed to my side.

She pulled up a chair and gently placed her small translucent hand on the nucleus of my pain.

Her fingers felt like stones that were warmed on a fire.

I felt the healing energy of her hands, like warm lava on my side.

She said the inflammation I had would have doubled some people over.

“Run.”

“Don’t Walk”.

“To buy Turmeric”, she said.

The old dormant inflammation began to rage like a hot air balloon that was finally able to let out a guttural scream.

In the safe spiritual room, we talked about the treatments for my endometriosis, and the alternative – to do nothing.

I felt her hand dispersing heat throughout my body now, and had to remove the furry blanket.

Once the session was complete, she advised me to stand up slowly to gain my balance.

I felt light.

And pain free.

I KNOW!

I could hardly believe it myself.

The exhausting thief of my energy was gone. It was comfortable being ignored, but couldn’t stand the compassion.

Then I ran out to buy some turmeric.



 Previously published on Medium.com
3

Kids Like it When Something Goes Wrong

Kids like it when something goes wrong

‘Balloons’ by Photopin

There was no need to hire a clown for my seventh birthday.

Six girlfriends and I piled into my Dad’s huge 1960 Chevy station wagon to drive to the skating rink for my party.

But his car wouldn’t start, so he got out and pushed it.

But he slipped and fell in the mud.

When he finally managed to stand up, he looked like he had been decorated with chocolate icing, which made us giggle uncontrollably.

He, however, didn’t find it as funny, and went into the house.

Then two shiny yellow taxis pulled up to the rescue. My friends had never been in a cab before, and their excitement made it the most memorable birthday party ever!

Later that day, my Dad said: “kids like it when something goes wrong, it’s more fun.”

That stuck with me, and often it is more fun when the unexpected occurs.

It often sets me on a better path.

The fight or flight mode when something goes wrong makes me use my creative energy to take action instead of overthinking the situation.

You can’t control the wind but you can adjust your sails

When the trains aren’t running or the car won’t make it up the hill in the snow, it changes my routine, and also changes my outlook.

It makes me appreciate how often things do run smoothly.

As I wait in anticipation for the unexpected to happen again.

Have you ever had more fun when things went wrong?

Stop Following the Herd and Lead

Stop following the herd

Malala – photo by Photopin

It only takes one person to stop following the herd to change the whole world.

Like a schoolgirl in Pakistan.

Malala Yousefzai used her intellect to fight for a girl’s right to an education.

She was not afraid of anyone, because going to school was not a crime.

Then the Taliban tried to assassinate her and shot her in the face.

Intimidation did not stop her. It had the opposite effect.

It inspired her fight harder for girls to have an education.

After many surgeries in America, she recovered.

The whole world began to notice the bravery of the teenage girl.

She won The Nobel Peace Prize.

She used her power of reasoning to ask WHY we do things the way we do.

Intellectuals don’t follow the herd, they lead it.

The ability to reason is what distinguishes us from other living creatures.

The herd instinct isn’t in Malala.

She doesn’t guard the status quo, she uses her intellect and questions it.

All art and music and social development stem from our power to reason, or our intellect.

When we go beyond instinctual behavior, our desires turn into goals that with benefits beyond ourselves.

Then we gain understanding and co-operate with others to reach the goal.

In Sanskrit ‘Vedanta’ means an “absolute knowledge”, which includes experience and karma.

Life is a series of experiences.

Our badge of recognition that we are alive is the action that we take.

If our actions or karma are to heal the world, they return benefits to us; if they are to harm the world, they return consequences.

Instead of blindly accepting our reality, we can view it with critical eyes, and change it.

Like Malala.

She knows that acting the same way as everyone around her and expecting a different result doesn’t solve herd problems.

Where Do You Go To Get Your Answers?

The Thinker - Photo pin creative commons

The Thinker – Photo pin creative commons

My mind is a noisy place, where my worries and doubts compete for my attention like auctioneers.

But I have an unfair advantage.

Where the noise stops.

An old soft chair.

When I curl up in it for ten minutes in peace, the static in my mind disappears, and I feel better.

“What we achieve inwardly will change outer reality.” — Plutarch

I inhale, aware that the air flowing through my body is shared with everyone on earth. Exhaling, my muscles relax — shoulders, spine, knees and toes feel softer. I detox from negative thoughts.

My inner voice softly speaks to me, telling me I have control over myself, and I can choose to be happy no matter what my circumstances are.

“Wisdom doesn’t come from speaking…It comes from listening.” Tao Te Ching

I hear that I have infinite worth.

I melt into the soft chair, like a glowing candle of pure radiant loving light. I am free from distractions, and free from fear. I am a success.

I am newborn with source energy, and am strong enough to take on anything.

I am no better or less than anyone. We are all divine love.

I feel thankful for everyone on my journey, and love for myself.

Sitting in the chair clarifies my priorities in life.

Suddenly I know what to do, confident that my actions when I leave the chair will be right, and will come from a place of love.

Whenever I begin to feel disconnected, my chair draws me back so I can replace my racing thoughts with simplicity, patience and compassion.

Refreshing my mind and body helps me return to bliss.

I love who I am becoming with the wisdom in my soft chair.

Where Do You Go To Get Your Answers?

This story appeared on Medium.com/

How Empathy Flew Home to Heal Herself

Empathy Heals

Photo Credit: Blue Pansy – photopin creative commons

With empathy, as in life, what goes around comes around.

The Facebook quiz revealed that I am an empath.

I can’t argue with the esteemed researchers at Facebook.

Empaths can ~

1. Sense the emotions of others and can experience their pain and joy.

2. Have double vision to see the world through their eyes and understand it through someone else’s.

3. Experience someone else’s happiness as if it were our own and feel compassion for their sadness which makes their own problems seem insignificant.

4. Imagine what it is like to be someone else.

Each of us makes multiple empathetic decisions a day.

We let someone buying one item in the supermarket line-up go ahead of us. We let a taxi cut in front of us in traffic because he is on the clock to earn his pay.

Empaths show others their worth which in turn enhances their worth and builds relationships.

They feel empathy for people like artists whom we have never met.

I have never been to The Guggenheim Museum. But I have heard that Frank Lloyd Wright designed the building so the art on the walls look different at various times of the day as the light from the windows changes.

I imagine the place would fill my senses, and make me grateful for my own existence.

When Rihanna sings the song “Stay” she sings to my soul, similar to the author of a book who expresses my own attitudes exactly.

Artists feel empathy for us.

Empathy is a smart, beautiful, social butterfly roosting with its’ peers and brightening their world, suspending self-interest by expressing interest in them.

My empathy acrostic:

E — Ego put aside

M — Meditation connects you to yourself and all beings

P — Put yourself in another person’s shoes

A — Always be open minded

T — Think how you would feel if it was you

H — Helping people

Y — Your empathy increases with reading and relating.

The best thing about empathy?

Understanding someone else’s feelings, helps you better know your own

If you aren’t able to vicariously experience another’s feelings or thoughts, your imagination can take you there. You will never know exactly how someone else feels, but by imagining how you would feel in their situation brings you closer.

I imagine I would feel cold, scared, and unloved if I were homeless. When I buy a coffee for the man sitting on the sidewalk outside the coffee shop, I am also buying him a cup of care. The look in his eyes when he grips the hot beverage in his dirty, weathered hands shows me that.

It could easily be me sitting on the sidewalk if my circumstances were different, and I would want someone to feel empathy for me.

When you are in pain, it is hard to feel empathy for others.

First you need to heal yourself.

The most important person to feel empathy for is YOU.

Then you will find your wings.

And your beautiful colors will be altered in the changing light of the day.

photo credit: Blue Pansy /photopin creativecommons

Previously published on Medium – all rights belong to Ann Hoy

Cramming for My Last Performance Review…Ever

final performance review

Slogan in rainbow pens

 

When I was eleven, I decorated the landscape with my slogan, BANKSY style.

I wrote it on rocks, tattooed it on my hand, squeaky chalked it on a chalkboard, wrote it with my finger in the sand at the beach, and in the sky with a pretend pen.

I entered teenagehood inked in a pastel rainbow of felt pens.

My slogan?

I WAS HERE

Why a slogan?

I was excited to go new places without my parents and make decisions on my own for the first time and leave evidence of the experiences everywhere I went.

I was being me.

Over the next thirty years, life seemed to happen to me, and I became too busy for slogans, while pursuing my goals of having it all and doing it all. It felt like I was twisting and turning at full speed through the pathways of a maze in a rat race pace.

I felt disconnected as if I was more of a human doing than a human being.

Five years ago, I stepped back and finally recognized how much time has passed. Both of my parents had passed away, and instead of longing for my independence, I longed to spend an hour with them.

Taking a moment to ponder my life helped connect me to myself and to the spiritual world beyond.

I was back to being me.

I don’t believe death is it. After death, I think I proceed forward to the next stage in my spiritual life.

But first I must pass a performance review.

How do I prepare for this? I can’t change my past, but I can work on creating my future.

But I have some serious cramming to do to develop my character and skills to become the best person I can be. If I don’t ace that performance review I fear being sent to some God-forsaken place, or face an indoctrinated Catholic’s worst nightmare — to suffer in purgatory with all the other sinners for eternity!

By creating my own Hippocratic Oath, like the one doctors take, I outlined all the character traits and skills I need to work on to be my best.

What is my new slogan?

TREAT OTHERS HOW I WANT TO BE TREATED

My oath is all about who I become as a person.

It is about being kind, compassionate and forgiving.

Tony Robbins says: “Who you become as a person is the ultimate reward. The goal is about what it makes of me as a human being while pursuing it.”

I feel so relaxed knowing that I am not going to get anywhere in my life’s journey!

The journey is about becoming, not arriving.

It’s about this minute –

Now!

I don’t know when my performance review will be, so I am eternally grateful for my blessings today, and the opportunity to live my life to my potential.

The reward is who I become, and I realize that my greatest gift is that:

I AM HERE

Originally published on Medium in The #ChooseYourself Writers Group:   https://medium.com/choose-yourself

photo credit:  photopin.com/ creativecommons.orgPens in rainbow colors

#gratitude #doing #being #performance #oath #becoming

  • Go to the profile of AnnHoy

    AnnHoy

    Welcome! I am Ann Hoy blogging about expanding your life — #loveyourself, #positivethinking, #optimizingyourself, and #wellbeing are recurring themes.

     

    Coffee Headaches: How I Overcame The Incurable Pain

    Coffee Headaches

    My behavior doesn’t define me, my ability to change it does

     

    After trying unsuccessfully to quit coffee for three months, I quit in ten minutes.

    How did I do it?

    I did it with the help of my three sons.

    The idea of quitting coffee had been percolating in my mind for a while, and the boys knew it.

    On our way to the park one day, I stopped at a coffee shop to grab a coffee. It was a scalding hot day in July.

    My middle son said: “Why do you need a coffee on such a hot day?”

    “Don’t you want a cold drink instead?” said the oldest.

    Then the youngest said: “Didn’t you say you were quitting coffee, Mom?”

    I always told them to do what they say they’re going to do, and I wasn’t following my own advice.

    Worse than failing to quit coffee, was failing to lead by example. And I was being held accountable.

    Why quit coffee? The adverse side effects:

    1. The shaking hands after drinking three cups. 2. The “coffee headaches” if I didn’t drink a cup upon waking up. 3. The coffee cravings that felt like I wasn’t choosing coffee- it was choosing me.

    I quit coffee that moment in the parking lot, but the shift in my behavior came with side effects.

    I didn’t drink coffee that day, or the next day, or the day after that. I had a coffee withdrawal headache that continued for three days. But on the fourth day, my coffee headache was gone.

    My new habits no longer revolved around drinking coffee. I didn’t miss the smooth, dark, warm, aromatic beverage — much!

    I started drinking water or tea instead.

    I knew what I had to do, but it was the guilt from my family that made me commit.

    My behavior didn’t define me, my ability to change it did.

    In the end, I quit for love. Love for myself and my kids.

    Once I was freely choosing what to drink, I found that coffee really wasn’t my cup of tea.

    photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/11037770@N00/287004622“></a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com“>photopin</a> <a

    pref=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/“>(license)</a>

    This story was also published on Medium.

    All Boys are SUPERSTARS

    All Boys are Superstars

    All Boys are Superstars

     

    My three adult sons,  ages 18, 21 and 22, experienced challenges and triumphs as they grew into young men, but fellow Canadian Justin Bieber became a man with the eyes of the world watching and reporting on his every move.  This week he apologized for his actions of the past year on The Ellen Degeneres show, and I wrote this poem for him.

    Boy Star

    By: Ann Hoy

    All boys are stars
    In the stellar nursery
    Of the night sky
    Soothing lullabies of light,
    The North Star is bright

    You were fourteen
    When ascending the sun
    Your childhood done
    Adolescent superstar
    Pushed up way too far

    You could not shine
    Without the darkness of night
    And your boy light
    Flashed into a mature man
    In the frying pan

    #JustinBieber #childstar #adolescent #boy #mature #man #superstar #childhood

    photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/67926342@N08/6175343447″>Justin Bieber Billboard Music Awards 2011-12</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/”>(license)</a>

     

    A Year of This, Makes A Lifelong Learner

    Learning is fun

    Learning to grow food is fun

    photo credit:Barrett Garden Work Day -photopin.com

    While schools have switched from chalkboards to keyboards, skills like how to think independently and how to collaborate with others are not taught by a computer – those skills are taught by great teachers who have a huge impact on our lives.

    The memory of our favorite teacher stays with us after we finish school, because they are among our first adult leaders, other than our parents.

    My favorite teacher was my grade three teacher, Mrs. Pulsford, way back in 1970, in Vancouver. She was a bar-raiser, mentor, and earth angel who cared about us, and turned us into students that cared about what she was teaching.

    1. Great teachers encourage you to never give up on your dreams

    The hippie/scholar knew that music education helps kids do better in subjects like math.* When she played guitar in music class, with an orchid in her velvet black hair for flower power, she motivated me to sign up for the school guitar lesson program.

    “Teachers open the door but you must enter by yourself”
    Chinese Proverb.

    2. Great Teachers Teach Us That change Starts With Us

    First she connected her students, by forming groups of eight students to read aloud together. We bonded, and belonged, and generated positive peer pressure and better grades. Our open book comprehension tests vaulted our reading levels. When we moved our chairs into a circle to read, we felt like the nomads we studied in our textbooks.

    The summer after that class, I read every junior mystery book at the local public library due to my new love of reading.

    Once she connected the students to one another, she connected us with our school community, when we tackled the school litter problem. Our low tech anti- litter campaign was bootstrapped with paper, crayons and safety pins.

    Our hand drawn flowers had tears rolling down them, and the words “litter makes the flowers cry” under them. We pinned them to our jackets, and wore them outside at recess and lunch.
    When a student littered, we said: “you dropped something”, and the awareness we raised helped us eliminate the litter problem.

    3. Great Teachers Honor Our Individuality And Unique Talents

    Why fit in when you were born to stand out?
    -Dr. Seuss

    Celebrating our differences in a system that rewards compliance and conformity was a feat. Mrs. Pulsford balanced the teeter totter of conformity and individuality so well, that we fit in by being ourselves.

    I think the reward for conformity is that everyone likes you except yourself.
    — Rita Mae Brown

    She believed in our gifts and talents, and, like a magician, with gemstone eyes behind black framed glasses, she pulled the best out of us.

    One day our group was assigned to bake a chocolate cake. Allowing eight kids to access the forbidden teacher’s staff room, turn on the oven, operate an electric mixer, and break eggs was the epitome of trust, and we didn’t disappoint her.

    We learned to stop spilling batter on the recipe when we could no longer read it. We measured and mixed the ingredients and cleaned up the mess. We learned to do something we had never done before with a group. This made our future math problems on measuring and dividing a breeze.

    Like birds learning to fly, our self-sufficiency and confidence grew:
    Birds make great sky-circles
    of their freedom.
    How do they learn it?
    They fall, and falling,
    they are given wings.

    Rumi

    4. Great Teachers involve us in experiencing new things

    Entrepreneur Richard Branson’s believes children learn more from travelling than being in the classroom.

    Tactile and interactive quantum learning moments aren’t achieved through technology. The incubator in our grade three class housed baby chicks, which we could pick up, to feel their warm, downy feathers. We loved those chicks, and were sad when they grew too big for the classroom, and had to return to the farm, but we understood.

    She placed the baby teeth we lost in glasses of Coke, so we could watch them disintegrate until they vanished. We grew green bean plants in the windowsill of the classroom and stuck our fingers in the soil to test the moisture level and decide if they needed to be watered.

    With thirty four students in her class, Mrs. Pulsford was constantly changing the environment to make it exciting to learn in. We either had a class outdoors, with no walls, or we visited another classroom to see how they learn, so learning never became stagnant. We learned by doing.

    5. Great Teachers Re-imagine the old ways of doing things

    Entrepreneur Mark Cuban says: “99.99 percent of the things we do in business are being done the way they have always been done. No one has re-imagined how things should be done. That is what successful people do” *

    “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”
    Albert Einstein

    6. Great teachers make learning fun

    As co-creators in a relaxed environment, we were free to explore and make mistakes. Happiness was conducive to acquiring knowledge and common sense.

    As she read ‘Jabberwocky’ by Lewis Carrol, to us, her voice changing from soft to loud to emphasize the beat of the nonsense words, and circling our desks in stereo, she transported us to the dark swamp of tangled language, and engaged us in her passion for poetry…

    ‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
    Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
    All mimsy were the borogoves,…
    And the mome raths outgrabe

    7. Great teachers ask “WHY NOT?” 

    For homework, she asked us to mail a postcard to her home address. We could either  make a postcard or buy one, then address it, write her a message, buy a 6 cent stamp and affix it, and place it in the mail box outside the drugstore. We learned where mail came from, and how to use the postal system.

    She surprised us when she mailed a hand-made postcard back to each of us at home. Mine had a pink flower drawn on the front, and a message inside that thanked me for my postcard with The University of British Columbia campus on it, where she had studied. Years later, this is where I studied, inspired by her.

    8. Great teachers raise the bar by getting out of the students’ way

    My takeaway from her class is that life is our greatest teacher, and our family, friends, and adversaries are our teachers. Our passion exists in the joy of learning and our curiosity about the future.

    Someone once said: “you have no friends, no enemies, only teachers.”

    If you desire to be a lifelong learner, and a lifelong dreamer, then all you need, is one year, like the one that I was lucky enough to have, back in grade three.
    #raisingbiz #lifelonglearning #AnnHoy #teachers #teaching #impact

    #greatteachers #engage #encourage

    photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/32561453@N05/9985350765″>Barrett Garden Work Day</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/”>(license)</a>

    Learning is fun

    Learning by Doing

    Hat tips to:

    Seth Godin – Education System essay

    *http://www.worldmag.com/2014/09/study_music_really_does_make_kids_smarter

    *http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/236587

    photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/32561453@N05/9985399006″>Barrett Garden Work Day</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/”>(license)</a>

    A Job Interview Doesn’t Have to Be Nerve-Racking

    A Job Interview doesn't have to be nerve-racking

    View the job interview as a conversation to market yourself

    How to Ace The Job Interview

    Job Interviews 101:

    You have sent your resume and cover letter, and you have been asked to come for a job interview – now what?

    Preparation is the key to making a good impression quickly.  Arrive early, and dress appropriately for the position you are applying for.  It is a safe bet to dress conservatively and business-like.  Your appearance is one of the ways to market yourself to the employer.

    Bring a copy of your resume to the interview, so you have the dates of your work experience at your fingertips.  Also, bring a copy of your references, in case the employer asks for them.

    While an interview can be nerve-racking, it is only a conversation, albeit one that you must prepare for.  A tough question, such as: “what is your greatest weakness”? can be answered honestly, but try to turn it into a positive.  For example, you can say that you are a perfectionist, but you have learned that your best work is good enough.

    Let the employer lead the discussion, and don’t talk too much. Tell the employer why you want to work for his or her company, and a little bit about your background and achievements and your future goals.  Research the company beforehand to establish some common ground, and prepare a few questions to ask the interviewer, if time permits.

    By listening to the interviewer, and observing the work environment, you will gain clues about why you want to work for the company, or in some cases, why the company wouldn’t be a good fit for you. You are interviewing them in a way too.

    At the end of the interview, thank the interviewer for his or her time.  You may either be contacted for a second interview, or you might not be contacted at all, or, you may be offered the job on the spot.  Decide ahead of time when you are available to start.  It is a courtesy to give your present employer two weeks notice, but you can negotiate employment start date depending on the circumstances.  You can send an email or thank you card after the interview expressing how you enjoyed meeting the person and that you look forward to hearing from them soon.

    photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/ncngpao/9673058279/”>North Carolina National Guard</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/”>cc</a>